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PAEMANU : TAURAKA TOI - A LANDING PLACE
will occupy the six galleries on the second floor of the Dunedin
Public Art Gallery from 12 December 2021 – 27 April 2022

Exhibition areas / Kaupapa

Tohorā
Tohorā

Rongomaiaia Te Whaiti

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Tohorā 14
Tohorā 14

Tapirioteragi Pirikahu

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Tohorā 1
Tohorā 1

Emma Kitson

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Tohorā
Tohorā

Rongomaiaia Te Whaiti

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1/23

Tohorā is anchored by the presence of a pygmy sperm whale skull, recovered from a baby that stranded with its mother at Wharekauhau, on the Southern coast of the Wairarapa. The surrounding artworks draw on the physical, spiritual and cultural properties of this taonga to explore Kāi Tahu relationships with tohorā.
The spiritual connection between Kāi Tahu and tohorā stretches back before the first migration to Aotearoa. Waiata, pūrākau, whakataukī and place names record the role of tohorā as ancestors, guides and kaitiaki. With the arrival of Takata Pora (ship people), and the establishment of the whaling industry, came new relationships between tohorā and people.
Fragility and strength; memory and materiality; power and care: Tohorā sits at the intersection of these collision points, acknowledging the many histories and whakapapa which connect Kāi Tahu and tohorā.

Artists - Mahi Toi  

Martin Awa Clarke Langdon, Rongomaiaia Te Whaiti, Caitlin Donnelly,
Emma Kitson, Vicki Lenihan, Mya Morrison-Middleton, Madison Kelly,
Tapirioterangi Pirikahu, Ephraim Russell, Kate Stevens West

Martin Awa Clarke Langdon

Martin Awa Clarke Langdon

Untitled (rendered) 2021 Uku/clay, rākau/wood, peita/paint, tāia kāpia/3D printed resin The relationships between our tūpuna and ika moana are not necessarily the same as the ones we see today. As a history of new materials, new ideals and demands came to our shores, they altered the very nature of who we were and how we practised. This has had a flow on effect into the present day. We are now left to remember the fragments of intimate knowledge we once possessed.

Rongomaiaia Te Whaiti

Rongomaiaia Te Whaiti

Maata/Martha/Wharerimu 2021 Oil on canvas

Kate Stevens West

Kate Stevens West

Tere Tohorā, Tere Tangata. Where Whales Journey, People Follow One World For Another [I] Migration Overturning The Waka [I] Rakāitekura and Tūāhuriri Tethered [I] Luke and Henry Kurawaka/Tender Ties Kohikohi Tethered [II] Southern Right Whale Overturning The Waka [II] Hine Whākana and Irihāpeti One World For Another [II] Ross and Seonaigh 2021 Gesso, oil paint, traditional ink [tītī oil, soot, tarata gum, rautawhiri berry], kōkōwai [red earth and tītī oil], brass eyelets, unstretched linen

Tapirioteragi Pirikahu

Tapirioteragi Pirikahu

Te ia Aa, Te ia Oo – Connecting through time and space 2021 Acrylic, graphite Connecting through the terrestrial and celestial knowledge, with the understanding that each exists because of each other. Nā John Tahupārae

Emma Kitson

Emma Kitson

Te Whare Moemoeā, Halfcast House 2021 Paper, ink, metal The inspiration for this artwork is the whare of my kuia Anne Wharetutu and her sealer/whaler husband George Newton of Scotland on Whenua Hou. This whare was a home for my half-caste tūpuna; the first to walk two worlds. What were their dreams for their descendants? What future did they imagine? Whenua Hou is recognised as the first planned bicultural settlement in New Zealand.

Caitlin Donnelly

Caitlin Donnelly

Mahana 2021 Woollen blankets, wood, steel wire Chains Ocean Wai Horoi Mother Whānau Iwi Pākehā Papatūānuku Wool Tohorā Warmth Comfort Survival Ka mua, ka muri

Madison Kelly & Maya Morrison- Middleton

Madison Kelly & Maya Morrison- Middleton

Tūtakitaka 2021 Tohorā rara (found near Waiputai), milled harakeke fibre, whītau (Makaweroa, Ruapani, no.88), glass beads, tōtara, feathers, seaglass, two channel audio track Ways of knowing, communicating and navigating, flow between species and generations. In communion with tohorā and tōtara, Kāi Tahu meet Takaroa. From these encounters a language of exchange and care emerges, demanding to be spoken.

Ephraim Russell

Ephraim Russell

Taki Apakura [lament] 2021 Mixed media Taki Apakura [lament] explores local parochial structures, gothic architectural frameworks, and early travellers that settled in Dùn Èideann, anchored to the significant landing sites of our Kāi Tahu people. Interweaving ancestral stories of the local whaling history of Ōtākou, Taki Apakura [lament] weaves narratives of personal identity, mana moana, mana whenua, whakapapa, love, and humility through an 1830s seascape.

Vicki Lenihan

Vicki Lenihan

He Whao | Skills 2021 He kai kei aku rikarika – there is food at my hands SLS nylon and steel acrylic paint A moment of whakapapa and whakapāpā: of bloodlines and communication; opportunity and redirection; new territories, new technologies, new possibilities. A representation of the moment of assumption, the fusion of intentions and resources in hand, reimagined in this current era of survival of the most clued-up.

Tohorā 20

Tohorā 20

Rongomaiaia Te Whaiti

Rongomaiaia Te Whaiti

Tohorā 18

Tohorā 18

Madison Kelly  Maya Morrison-Middleton

Madison Kelly Maya Morrison-Middleton

Tohorā 15

Tohorā 15

Tohorā 12

Tohorā 12

Emma Kitson

Emma Kitson

Tohorā 23

Tohorā 23

Vicki Lenihan

Vicki Lenihan

Tohorā 10

Tohorā 10

Tohorā 9

Tohorā 9

Rongomaiaia Te Whaiti

Rongomaiaia Te Whaiti

Tohorā 8

Tohorā 8

Vicki Lenihan

Vicki Lenihan

Emma Kitson

Emma Kitson

Tohorā 3

Tohorā 3